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Texas Orthopedics, Sports & Rehabilitation Associates

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Be safe this holiday season


Monday, December 23, 2013

Bringing Smiles to 22 Children!




Every year during this charitable season, Texas Orthopedics finds a way to give back to the community. Through the local charity Partnerships for Children, we've focused our giving to the littlest and most vulnerable members of our Central Texas community - abused and neglected children who are in the care of Child Protective Services.

The response from our physicians and staff has been overwhelming. Twenty-two children will have a brighter and merrier holiday filled with toys, clothes and other important needs.  Happy Holidays!

Keep up with Texas Orthopedics news! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter (@TexasOrthopedic)

Friday, December 20, 2013

Dr. Bergin Earns 'Reining' Bragging Rights

Texas Orthopedics’ very own Dr. Barbara Bergin received Top Ten honors in three events at this year’s National Reining Horse Association’s 2013 Futurity and North American Affiliate Championship in Oklahoma City.  Riding Starbucks for Chex (barn name Sampson for his long mane), Dr. Bergin won two 3rd places and one 7th place.

This is the first time Dr. Bergin has advanced to this level.  She qualified three times in the past, but her horse, Señor, went ‘lame’ every year. (For those not familiar with the term ‘lame’ it means there is either an injury or medical condition that causes a horse to be unsound).  Dr. Bergin retired Señor last year. T
his was her first year competing with Sampson. They start their 2014 season at the end of January.

Congrats, Dr. Bergin!


Have a question? Ask us on Facebook or Twitter (@TexasOrthopedic)

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Stay Safe While Stringing Holiday Lights: Don't let "Ho, Ho, Ho', turn into 'Ouch'!



 
Who can forget the scenes of Chevy Chase as Clark Griswold hanging thousands of lights in National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation? While his careless and clumsy manner makes for some good humor, the reality is that every year, holiday light hanging causes serious injuries.
At Texas Orthopedics, we've treated several Central Texans who've suffered serious falls that have resulted in back, hip and leg injuries.
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a three-year study and found that about 18,000 people were treated in emergency rooms for falls alone while hanging Christmas lights. That number only includes people who sought medical treatment in an emergency room. It's estimated that the real number of injuries is significantly higher; perhaps two or three times this number.
According to U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, hospital ERs treat about 12,500 people for injuries such as falls, cuts, and shocks related to holiday lights, electrical decorations, and Christmas trees every year.
Safety Tips:
These tips may seem like common sense but we'd rather be safe than sorry:
  • Don't hang lights in the rain
  • Never put a ladder or stool on a slippery or wet surface
  • Never plug lights in if you are near water or ice
  • Be careful if it's windy. A gust could knock you off balance
  • Always decorate in daylight and watch out for old nails, staples and broken bulbs from years past
  • Never hang over an edge from the roof to hang lights
  • Make sure the ladder you use is wide-based and in good condition to handle your weight and body size. Don't stand on the very top of the ladder.
  • Don't mix alcohol with decorating - that can be downright dangerous.
  • Have someone present with you while hanging the lights to get help should an accident occur
While you may want to outdo Clark Griswold, use common sense and take the extra precautions so you can fully enjoy this holiday season.
From all of us at Texas Orthopedics, have a safe and happy holiday!
Have a question? Ask us on Facebook or Twitter (@TexasOrthopedic)
 
 

Monday, December 2, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday



Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, December 5th
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Marc DeHart, MD
Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1100. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, January 9th.

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

When Is It Time to See a Doctor?



Dr. John McDonald was recently asked to give advice on when it is appropriate to see a doctor for an orthopedic issue. Check out the November issue of Austin Fit Magazine to read the article.

Monday, November 4, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday!



Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, November 7th
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Marc DeHart, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1176. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, December 5th.

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Making Smart Shoe and Bag Choices




Post provided by The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery

Our choice of shoes and bags may be placing unnecessary stress on joints and muscles that over time may cause serious pain or injury.

“Large purses and briefcases can cause shoulder, neck, elbow and back pain, and even serious injury,” said San Francisco orthopaedic surgeon and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) spokesperson Sara L. Edwards, MD. “And wearing poorly fitting shoes, especially those with high heels, platforms or pointed toes, can result in bunions, hammer toes, corns, knee and lower back pain and other conditions. I’ve seen many women with ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) injuries from wearing wedge sandals and high heels. I’ve also seen men with foot conditions from ill-fitting dress or work shoes.”

Fortunately, being fashionable doesn’t have to hurt. Members of the AAOS, the doctors who treat muscle and joint pain and injury, offer the following tips for avoiding shoe and bag related pain and injury.

Rethink your purse, briefcase or backpack
  •  In general, your handbag should not exceed 10 percent of your body weight. This means a 150 pound person should carry no more than 15 pounds.
  • When packing your briefcase or large purse, pack heavier items low and toward the center.
  • Do not carry a heavy briefcase, tote or purse for long periods of time; if you must, wear your purse or bag over your shoulder (not in the crook of your arm which can strain the elbow muscles and joints) and switch sides often. If possible, carry your bag diagonally over the opposite shoulder and hip.

Buy and wear the right shoe
  • Try on new shoes (both the left and the right) at the end of the day. Your feet normally swell and become larger after standing or sitting during the day.
  • There should be 1/2-inch space from the end of your longest toe to the end of the shoe.
  • Your toes should not feel pinched or cramped. You should be able to wiggle them freely.
  • Most high heeled-shoes have a pointed, narrow toe box that crowds the toes and forces them into an unnatural triangular shape. Over time, this can cause the foot to take on the shape of the shoe causing deformities like hammer toes and corns.
  • There is no such thing as a "break-in period." With time, a foot may push or stretch a shoe to fit, but this can cause foot pain and damage.
  • Shoes that lace or buckle, have Velcro or some type of strapping mechanism, provide more support to your arch.
Keep your feet fit
  • Routine foot and leg stretching exercises, such as rolling your foot over a tennis or golf ball or stretching your legs and feet before you get out of bed, can strengthen muscles and alleviate pain, especially as you age.
  • After a long day of walking or standing, elevate your feet and legs to relieve pressure.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Meet our Rheumatologist!

Dr. Robert Koval, University of Texas alumni, was recently interviewed by The University of Texas College of Natural Sciences. Watch the video to learn more about why Dr. Koval enjoys being a Rheumatologist.




Monday, October 7, 2013

Orthopedic Surgeons' Comprehensive Approach to the Evaluation of Groin Pain






Post provided by The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

According to a literature review appearing in the September 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), one in four people develop hip arthritis—damage to the surfaces in the hip joint—before the age of 85 that contributes to groin pain.

Contributing factors to the development of hip arthritis and, subsequently, groin pain may include one or more of the following:
  • a sports-related injury;
  • prior surgery to the hip;
  • infection of bone or soft tissue;
  • a defect present at birth;
  • problems with growth and development, and
  • traumatic occupational and recreational history, bone fractures, or a history of trauma.
The specific symptoms, and the timing/onset of those symptoms, can help your doctor recommend the appropriate tests, imaging or referrals to diagnose and treat the cause of the pain.

“Individuals experiencing sudden, onset groin pain associated with trauma or bowel/bladder dysfunction, symptoms like fevers or abdominal discomfort should promptly seek medical attention,” says Juan C. Suarez, MD, lead author of the study and an orthopaedic surgeon with Cleveland Clinic Florida. “But, those with chronic pain, despite time and conservative management, also warrant evaluation.”

Young athletes participating in activities such as endurance sports, soccer, power lifting, ice hockey, and basketball are at an increased risk of developing hip osteoarthritis (OA), the “wear and tear” arthritis because of frequent, high stresses at the joint surface. In addition to hip arthritis, female athletes participating in endurance sports also are more likely to sustain hip and pelvic stress fractures than male athletes.

A detailed medical history and examination by a physician can help diagnose and manage the source of groin pain. “It is important to have a good network of physicians from multiple specialties,” says Dr. Suarez. “In my experience, the diagnosis is not always obvious and it may require multiple visits, examinations and referrals prior to reaching the correct diagnosis. A good network facilitates this process.”

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday!




Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, October 3rd 
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Tyler Goldberg, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1176. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, November 7th.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Doctor of the Week



Dr. Brendan MacKay is our Doctor of the Week!

Brendan J. MacKay, MD is a Board Eligible Orthopaedic Surgeon and Fellowship trained Hand Surgeon. Dr. MacKay is Board Eligible by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery and is a Candidate Member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. He has an interest in minimally invasive/endoscopic carpal tunnel surgery, complex hand reconstruction including microvascular and peripheral nerve surgery, sports injuries, joint replacement, and orthopedic trauma treatment.
 
Dr. MacKay is a native of Long Island, New York. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor of Science in Premedical Studies and Economics. Dr. MacKay attended the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and completed his residency in orthopaedic surgery at the New York University Langone Medical Center Hospital for Joint Diseases. He was selected as an Executive Chief Resident in his final year of training by Dr. Joseph Zuckerman, past President of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. After graduating from residency, he completed a fellowship in hand, microvascular, and peripheral nerve surgery at The Hand Center of San Antonio and the University of Texas Health Science Center under the auspices of Drs. David P. Green and William C. Pederson, internationally recognized authorities in hand surgery.
 
Dr. MacKay has co-authored several peer reviewed scientific articles and has presented at national orthopaedic meetings, including the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.
 
He currently serves as team physician for the McNeil High School football team and participates in the care of the American Hockey League Texas Stars.
 
In his free time, Dr. MacKay enjoys traveling to pursue downhill skiing, scuba diving, and golf.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

What is the Societal Value of Total Knee Replacement?


Post provided by American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery

With all the attention on the cost of health care, an important factor is being overlooked: the impact on society resulting from the treatment of a particular condition. Comparing that impact when both surgical and nonsurgical treatments are available is particularly important in a specialty such as orthopaedics, which focuses on restoring mobility and health.

“A number of studies have already looked at the cost-effectiveness to individual patients for certain orthopaedic procedures, including total hip and total knee arthroplasties,” said AAOS Past President John R. Tongue, MD. In outlining the goal behind “The Direct and Indirect Costs to Society of Treatment for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis,” a study published in the Aug. 21 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, Dr. Tongue noted, “We wanted to examine the cost-effectiveness of orthopaedic procedures from a societal point of view.

“For example, if you’re a 55-year-old teacher and you need a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to keep teaching, and you undergo the procedure, you’re going to continue to work; you’re going to continue to pay taxes. If you don’t, you’re more likely to sit around, developing other comorbidities, gaining weight, having poor quality of life, and collecting disability.”

Applying a new model
Inspired by published research that attempted to quantify the societal impact of deaths and injuries from roadway trauma, Dr. Tongue contacted an economist friend to see if it might be possible to similarly quantify the impact of orthopaedic procedures.

The economist, John Duffield, PhD, proposed conducting a literature search to identify previous work that may have covered similar ground, then building on that research to develop a new methodology that could be applied to specific medical conditions. To carry out this objective, AAOS engaged KNG Health Consulting, LLC, and its research partners at IHS Global, Inc., and Duke University.

$12 billion in savings
To estimate the societal value of TKA, the research team generated results based on adults age 40 years or older who underwent TKA during 2009. According to the authors, the study population accounted for 99 percent of all TKAs performed in the United States that year.

The researchers calculated direct costs, quality-of-life, and most importantly the lifetime indirect cost of TKA. These indirect costs components capture the effects of surgery on a patient’s ability to work, patient earnings, disability payments, and missed work days. For modeling purposes, the researchers conservatively assumed that all patients retire at age 75.

The research team found that, compared with nonsurgical treatment, undergoing TKA increased direct costs per patient by an average of $20,635 (based on 2009 dollars). Those costs were offset by societal savings of an average $39,565 per patient based on reduced indirect costs, producing an estimated $18,930 in lifetime savings to society per patient.

Overall, the researchers found that 85 percent of the societal savings were associated with increased employment and earnings. The remaining 15 percent were linked to fewer missed work days and lower disability payments.

Based on the more than 600,000 TKAs performed in the United States during 2009, the study authors estimated a lifetime societal savings of approximately $12 billion for the single year studied.

“When we submitted the study, there was some concern among reviewers that the findings could be interpreted as, ‘everyone should get surgery,’” said Dr. Koenig. “It’s important to understand that is not the conclusion of the study. The conclusion is that, for the cohort of people who have surgery, there are—on average—societal savings. For many reasons, some patients don’t undergo surgery. Our analysis was based on the cohort of patients who actually underwent surgery.”

Further research
The TKA study is the first of five similar research papers planned for publication, each examining the value of a different orthopaedic procedure.

“We chose a variety of conditions based on high economic impact and to demonstrate the breadth of our specialty,” said Dr. Tongue. “We have already submitted for publication papers on rotator cuff repair and anterior cruciate ligament repair, and two more studies—one looking at hip fracture and one on lumbar diskectomy—are in the works.”

“What I find most exciting about this research,” said Dr. Tongue, “is that it changes the conversation from how expensive orthopaedic procedures are, to how valuable they are. You don’t have to try to stretch any estimates, because the value for each procedure is tremendous.”

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Doctor of the Week

Dr. Greg Westmoreland is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Westmoreland.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Knee Replacement Surgery: New Health Economics Study Highlights Societal Benefits


Cost Savings are Good News as Aging Population Rapidly Increases
Demand for Relief from Chronic Knee Pain

The full impact of knee replacement surgery on both patients’ lives and on society includes significant overall cost savings, according to a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery
(JBJS). Researchers found that for the average patient undergoing knee replacement surgery, the expense of surgery is offset by indirect savings of nearly $40,000. This translates to an average lifetime societal benefit of $10,000-$30,000. Most of the societal savings come from the patient’s ability to maintain employment and increase earnings over a longer time in the workforce. The study also found benefits from fewer missed worked days and lower disability payments.

As an aging population stays in the workforce longer and obesity rates continue to climb, demand for total knee replacement surgery is expected to exceed 3 million by the year 2030 – up from 600,000 in 2009. Now with a new way of comparing direct and indirect costs between surgical and non-surgical treatments, patients suffering from end-stage osteoarthritis of the knee are able to get a quantitative look at the overall cost benefits of knee replacement surgery relative to the societal and economic savings.

“We know that when a knee replacement is done on patients at the appropriate time, it adds tremendous value to their lives. It gets them back to work and back to their families. It improves their quality of life and allows them to be productive and active again,” said John R. Tongue, MD, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons(AAOS) past-president. “But until now, that value has been hard to quantify. This study allows patients to see the big picture of the effect on their daily lives and in the long term.”

Dr. Tongue adds, “Demographics of knee replacement patients have dramatically changed as baby boomers age. They want and need to stay active but their joints can’t always keep up. In this economic environment, this study provides a new way of looking at cost that offers perspective to this growing population.”

Total knee replacement (or total knee arthroplasty (TKA)) is one of the most successful and life-enhancing surgical procedures. It significantly relieves pain for 90 percent of the patients who have the procedure, allowing them to return to work and tremendously improving their quality of life.

The fullstudy is available at www.ANationInMotion.org/value/knee. Video and audio pertaining to this news can also be found at http://www.digitalnewsrelease.com/index.php?q=AAOS_KneeStudy.

Doctor of the Week

Dr. David Savage is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Savage.


FREE Joint Replacement Seminar on Thursday


Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, Sept 5th 
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Marc DeHart, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1176. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday Oct 3rd

Friday, August 30, 2013

Labor Day Holiday Information


Texas Orthopedics will be closed on Monday, September 2nd for Labor Day. Everyone have a fun and safe holiday weekend!

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Proud to Welcome Brendan J. MacKay, MD

We are pleased to announce that Dr. MacKay will be joining Texas Orthopedics on Tuesday 9/3/13.

Orthopedic Surgeon
Hand Surgery

Brendan J. MacKay, M.D. completed his residency training in orthopedic surgery at New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases. He enhanced his practice by completing Fellowship training in hand, microvascular, and peripheral nerve surgery at The Hand Center of San Antonio and University of Texas Health Science Center. Dr. MacKay will see patients at the Northwest Austin, South Austin, and Round Rock locations.

Monday, August 26, 2013

Ice Cream Social - Thank you to our patients!

The 2013 Ice Cream Social was a huge success on 8/22.  Thank you to all of our patients who joined Dr. Goldberg and Dr. Davis for this event.  We appreciate your candid stories about your surgery experiences.






Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Robert Blais is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Blais.


Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. J. Clark is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Race.

Monday, July 29, 2013

New Research Looks at the Causes and Most Common Types of Broken Bones in Children

Post provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons


Fractures to the wrist are the most common in children under age 16;
snowboarding causes the most fractures per hour of exposure
 

While broken bones are not uncommon in children, a new study appearing in the April 2013 Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery(JBJS)looks at which fractures are most common in children, and which activities are most likely to cause fractures.

Approximately one-third of pediatric fractures occur during sport or recreational activity. In this Norwegian study, researchers sought to determine the incidence and causes of pediatric fractures in children under age 16. Exposure time to the most common childhood activities was measured through random interviews with parents in the study population.

There was an overall annual incidence rate of 180.1 fractures per 10,000 children. The distal radius, or wrist, was most often fractured, followed by fingers and toes. Snowboarding was associated with the highest activity-specific fracture rate estimated to be 1.9 fractures per 10,000 hours of exposure, which is four times higher than the fracture rates for soccer, and five times higher than trampoline use.


“In our study we discovered that snowboarding caused four times more fractures per exposure time compared to other common childhood activities,” said orthopaedic surgeon and lead study author Per-Henrik Randsborg, MD, PhD. “Furthermore, trampoline use did not seem to cause more fractures per hours of exposure than other popular childhood activities. In fact, handball and soccer had a higher risk of fractures than did trampoline use.”

Other Key Findings:
  • The mean age of all fractures was 10, and there were more fractures in boys (61.7 percent of all fractures).
  • Winter activities causing the most fractures per weekly hours of exposure were snowboarding, followed by playground use, ice skating and team handball (European).
  • High fracture activities in the summer months per weekly hours of exposure were team handball, followed by skateboarding/rollerblading, soccer, and playground and trampoline use.
  • Soccer has the highest rate of fractures overall, when not accounting for hours of exposure, followed by playground, bicycle and trampoline use.
  • Snowboarding is associated with a highest rate of wrist-specific fractures compared with other activities. Most of the children suffering wrist injuries while snowboarding were not wearing wrist guards.

“Our study indicates what childhood activities give the highest risk of fracture per time exposed to the activity,” said Dr. Randsborg. “The findings will be useful in identifying which activities that should be targeted for further studies regarding the implementation of effective preventive measures, so that children might continue to be physically active while reducing the number of preventable injuries.”

Doctor of the week!

Dr. John McDonald is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. McDonald.

FREE Joint Replacement Seminar on Thursday Aug 1st!


Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served.  Bring your friends and family! Date: Thursday, Aug 1st.  Time: 5 PM to 7 PM Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759.   Speaker: Tyler Goldberg, MD.
 
Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1176. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday Sept 5th.

Monday, July 22, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Robert Koval is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Koval.


Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. William Taylor is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Taylor.


Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Brian Hardy is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Hardy.


Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Orthopaedic Surgeons Promote Regular Exercise to Prevent and Minimize the Symptoms of Osteoarthritis

Post provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, affects an estimated 20 million Americans, including many middle-age Americans ages 45-65. That’s why the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) are touting the benefits of a balanced fitness/exercise program in preventing, and easing the symptoms of, osteoarthritis.

With osteoarthritis, the articular cartilage that covers the ends of bones in the joints gradually wears away leaving a frayed, rough surface that causes painful joint motion. Osteoarthritis usually develops after many years of use, and most often affects people who are middle-aged or older. Other risk factors for osteoarthritis include obesity, previous injury to the affected joint, and/or family history of osteoarthritis.

“While vigorous participation in sports and exercise over many years certainly can contribute to the wear and tear that causes osteoarthritis, an ongoing active lifestyle that includes regular, moderate-intensity, no- or low-impact exercise also is the best way to prevent and ease osteoarthritis symptoms and disease progression,” said AAOS 2nd Vice President David D. Teuscher, MD, a Beaumont, Texas orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine.
 
If done in 30-to-45 minute intervals, three-to-five days a week, exercise can help:
· reduce pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis
· improve flexibility and range of motion
· enhance muscle strength and endurance
· improve balance and coordination
· maintain a healthy weight
According to the AOSSM, a successful exercise program should include four components:
1. Warm-up - A warm-up helps the body get ready to exercise by elevating the heart rate slowly and increasing body temperature. Some warm-up activities include five minutes of mild intensity walking or riding a stationary bike.
2. Stretching/flexibility - Flexibility is essential to joint health, and yet everyone’s degree of flexibility varies greatly. Stretching should not be painful and should begin with easy stretches being held for 20 to 30 seconds each. 
3. Aerobic (cardio) activity - A stationery bicycle may provide the best aerobic exercise for an arthritic patient. It is easy on the joints and maintains flexibility, motion and strength. Start with five minutes on the bicycle and gradually increase activity by one minute or two minutes per week. 
4. Anaerobic (strength) activity - Strength training is beneficial for the prevention and treatment of osteoarthritis, especially light-to-moderate resistance exercise.
“If these supervised measures don’t work, you should seek the advice of a physician who may use weight bearing diagnostic x-rays to confirm the condition of your painful joint. After a proper diagnosis, physical therapy and/or medications may be recommended to further ease osteoarthritis symptoms,” added Dr. Teuscher. “For some patients, surgery to repair or replace knee or hip joints may be required to allow for a return to an active lifestyle and previously enjoyed activities.”
Stop exercising and consult with your physician if you have increased swelling, stiffness or joint pain, and/or dizziness, light headedness or shortness of breath following physical activity.

Monday, July 1, 2013

Doctor of the Week

Dr. Ai Mukai is our Doctor of the Week.  Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Mukai.


Monday, June 24, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Michael Loeb is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Loeb.

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Randall Schultz is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Schultz.

Monday, June 3, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday




Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, June 6th
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: David Savage, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1100. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, July 11th!

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Robert Schoen is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video below to learn more about Dr. Schoen.


Friday, May 24, 2013

Memorial Day Holiday Information


Texas Orthopedics will be closed on Monday, May 27th for Memorial Day. Everyone have a fun and safe holiday weekend!

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

 
Dr. Archie Whittemore is our Doctor of the Week. Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Whittemore!
 
 



Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Our Central Austin Office Has Moved!




We are pleased to announce the relocation of our Central Austin office on Tuesday, May 7th to the new Midtown Medical II building at the intersection of 38th Street and Lamar. This location will replace our 34th Street office.

The new office address is 911 West 38th Street, Suite 300, Austin, TX 78705. Parking is available in an attached parking garage with direct access to the clinic from the third floor of the parking garage.

In addition to clinic services, our physical therapy department is also expanding and moving to the new location.

The following physicians will see patients at our new Central Austin office:
  • Robert Blais, MD
  • Donald Davis, MD
  • Brian Hardy, MD
  • Michael Loeb, MD
  • John McDonald, MD
  • Ai Mukai, MD
  • Clark Race, MD
  • Robert Schoen, Jr., MD
  • Randall Schultz, MD
  • Archie Whittemore, MD
Make an appointment online or call us at (512) 439-1001.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Knee Implants Designed Specifically for Female Patients May Not Improve Outcomes


Post provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons


Anatomic differences between male and female knees have resulted in the creation and regular use of gender-specific implants. However, a new study presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) finds that a specialized prosthesis may not improve overall outcomes in female total knee replacement (TKR) patients.

Female implants are narrower, with an atypical angle and a thinner anterior flange (front rim), reflecting the unique characteristics of the female knee. These knee components are used frequently in TKR procedures in women, who represent 60 percent of all TKR patients.

In the study, researchers evaluated 1957 TKRs between 2006 and 2010 in women with 1515 (77.4 percent) utilizing female specific implants, compared to 771 TKRs from 2002 to 2006 prior to the availability of the gender component. Radiographs were reviewed for component fit, and clinical outcomes.

While there was less overhang of the knee implant with use of the female-specific prosthesis, improvements in patient knee range of motion, knee flexion (how far you can bend your knee), lateral release rates (reflecting kneecap movement), and pain scores were comparable in each of the two groups.

 

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Christopher Danney is our Doctor of the Week. Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Danney!

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Kenneth Bunch is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Bunch.
 
video

Monday, April 1, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday!



Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Tyler Goldberg, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1100. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, May 2nd!

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Doctor of the Week!


Joel Hurt, MD is our Doctor of the Week! Dr. Hurt is board certified in orthopedic surgery and fellowship trained in all aspects of arthroscopy and sports medicine.

Dr. Hurt's philosophy is patient-centered. He takes great care to address all of a patient's questions, to spend adequate time with each one and to treat each patient with respect as an individual rather than as a file number. A patient entrusts their body to a surgeon and therefore has a right to have the diagnosis and treatment plan explained in terms he or she can understand. The patient and physician can then determine the right course given his/her unique circumstances and goals. Finally, the end result of any treatment, and especially surgery, is judged primarily by the patient's satisfaction. A "great surgery" that does not address the patient's complaints is not a success.

Dr. Hurt is proficient in all areas of general orthopedics. This includes common hand surgery, total knee and hip replacement and general trauma. His specialized training is primarily in knee and shoulder surgery, including shoulder replacements. Above everything however, Dr. Hurt is most passionate about PRE-joint replacement options or joint preservation surgery. This involves a myriad of techniques which all revolve around the concept of keeping or restoring back to normal as much of the "original equipment" as possible.

Learn more about Dr. Hurt!

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Doctor of the Week

Dr. Joel Hurt is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Hurt.

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Minimally Invasive FAST Technique Offers Patients a New Treatment Option for Tendon-Related Injuries



Dr. Michael Loeb announces the offering of a new advanced treatment that quickly and safely removes the source of tendon pain. Based on technology developed in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, the FAST Technique—Fasciotomy and Surgical Tenotomy—is a minimally invasive treatment option for tendon and soft tissue injuries, such as tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow.

“I am extremely pleased with the results I am seeing in my patients who have been treated with the FAST Technique,” says Dr. Loeb. “They have reported experiencing a nearly painless treatment, a quick recovery, and lasting pain relief. I believe this new option will become a definitive treatment that removes the source of tendon pain.”

FAST is performed using a local anesthetic to numb the area, patients are awake and alert the entire time. During the treatment, conventional ultrasound imaging is used to identify the location of the scar tissue. Once located, a small instrument—the size of a toothpick—is inserted into the damaged tendon. The instrument delivers ultrasonic energy specifically designed to cut, break up, and remove damaged tissue safely and quickly, without disturbing the surrounding healthy tendon tissue.

“Before tendon-related injuries were a common problem that did not have a good solution,” says Dr. Loeb. “With the FAST Technique, I am able to intervene earlier in my patients’ care, change the nature of the disease, and get them back to their daily activities.”

Currently, over 10 million people in this country suffer from severe pain due to tendon scar tissue, which limits their range of motion and keeps them from living an active life. Common treatment options such as rest, pain medication, cortisone injections, or physical therapy address the pain but not the damaged tissue, the source of tendon pain. An open surgical procedure removes the damaged tissue but carries the risk of invasive procedures, including damage to the surrounding healthy tissue and a lengthy recovery time with restricted activity.

Unlike conventional treatment methods, the FAST Technique replicates the goal of an open surgical procedure by removing the damaged tissue, but in a minimally invasive manner. The FAST Technique usually takes 15 minutes or less, requires only an adhesive bandage to close the microincision, and offers quick recovery time for patients.

“I am excited about being able to provide the most technologically advanced treatment option for tendon injuries here in Austin that truly benefits my patients,” says Dr. Loeb.
 

Monday, March 11, 2013

Doctor of the Week!

Dr. Brannan Smoot is our Doctor of the Week! Watch the video to learn more about Dr. Smoot.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Dr. Tyler Goldberg Travels to the Japan Reconstructive Association Meeting


Tyler Goldberg, MD traveled to Japan in February to lecture at the Japan Reconstruction Association on total hip and total knee replacement surgery. While in Japan, Dr. Goldberg had the opportunity to teach orthopedic surgeons how to perform the My Knee total knee replacement technique as well as anterior hip replacement.



 

Monday, March 4, 2013

FREE joint replacement seminar this Thursday!



Learn more about non-surgical arthritis treatment options as well as total hip and total knee replacement surgery at Arthritis Camp! Refreshments are served. Bring your friends and family!

Date: Thursday, March 7th
Time: 5 PM to 7 PM
Location: Northwest Austin, 4700 Seton Center Pkwy, Ste. 200, Austin, 78759
Speaker: Marc DeHart, MD

Please RSVP by registering online or call 439-1100. If you can't make this seminar, plan to attend our next seminar on Thursday, April 4th!

Friday, March 1, 2013

Dr. John McDonald Published in The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery



Dr. John McDonald's article, Return to Play After Hip Arthroscopy With Microfracture in Elite Athletes, was published in the February edition of The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery.

The article details a study that compares elite athletes who underwent hip arthroscopy with and without microfracture (surgical technique that works by creating tiny fractures in the underlying bone) with respect to their ability to return to sport at the professional level. The study concluded that there was no detectable statistically significant difference in return to play rate after hip arthroscopy with microfracture and hip arthroscopy without microfracture. Professional athletes who underwent hip arthroscopy with microfracture procedure were able to return to the same high level of competition after surgery at a high rate.

Learn more about hip arthroscopy and Dr. McDonald here!

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Doctor of the Week!




Dr. Marc DeHart is our Doctor of the Week. He is a specialist in the surgical treatment of arthritis of the hip and knee, but also enjoys general orthopedic surgery and sports medicine. Dr. DeHart holds a Certificate of Added Qualification in Sports Medicine.

Dr. DeHart completed his Orthopaedic Residency at the Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. While on active duty with the United States Air Force, Dr. DeHart served as a F-16 Flight Surgeon for the 69th Tactical Fighter Squadron.

 Dr. DeHart is an Assistant Professor for the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is the first orthopedic surgeon from the Austin, TX area to be inducted into the American Orthopaedic Association.